Friday, November 22, 2013

Hook: Why Websites Fail

McDermott_ Hook


Why Websites Fail to Make Money

Business, Marketing, Strategy


FREE Nov. 22-24

Click HERE for FREE Copy


Most websites will struggle (and fail) to make money. Your website is a digital lighthouse for your business. It's meant to attract and guide customers to you. Naturally, it impacts the success of your marketing efforts and dictates whether people will actually buy from you.  

The problem? Most websites are getting it wrong. It's not your fault. But the fact remains, most of us have been lied to. We were trained to give customers the direct opposite of what they need. In Hook Why Websites fail to make money, you'll learn:
  • Why customers don't seem to care about your solution to their problems
  • Why they always seem to resist - even when they need your help
  • How to fascinate and attract the type of customers you want
  • The inevitable part of selling that gets worse when you avoid it
  • Why it's a struggle to "seal the deal" and close the sale
  • Presentation conflicts that prevent customers from buying
  • How to move customers through the buying process naturally, without coercion or manipulation.

Hook shares answers to these problems in two parts, Story and Method. Each part offers different, yet complimentary lessons on why websites fail, how customers buy and ultimately, how to change things for the better.

A Message from the Authors:

  Why did we create "Hook" and what brought us here?

 Like most people, we've learned a lot by working with our clients. And we started to notice some patterns. Namely, the people we talked to were facing similar problems. They had been giving customers the opposite of what they needed and they were not seeing the results they wanted. It's common for people to create something and just sit back and wait for people to come. But the "if you build it they will come" mantra just isn't effective. So we spent a lot of time sharing information and educating people on new ideas, new ways of thinking about and approaching their business. Once we started sharing all this great stuff we ended up sharing even more, which makes sense because if something's good you crave more right? As our business grew it became difficult to keep up. Sharing and consulting started to take a huge amount of our time. Some clients wanted to spend three to four hours a day in meetings. Then there's the prospective customers who want to feel confident you "know your stuff" so they ask for several meetings where they spend time picking your brain (testing you)--which is pretty common. But one-on-one sharing with lots of people is downright exhausting. That became clear as we found ourselves repeating the same concepts over and over to each new client. We didn't want to stop sharing (we actually wanted to share more) but we also needed more time. We needed to multiply ourselves. We needed our time back and we needed some leverage.

Hook became our solution. A way to to share helpful, valuable content with people that need it.